Book Review: Guy Kawasaki’s Enchantment

First off, I have to admit that I am a big Kawasaki fan. His first book, The Macintosh Way (now a free download), got me excited about running my own business and helped me launch Intelligent Games when I was at college. I was lucky enough to meet him in 2002 and he is as […]

First off, I have to admit that I am a big Kawasaki fan. His first book, The Macintosh Way (now a free download), got me excited about running my own business and helped me launch Intelligent Games when I was at college.

I was lucky enough to meet him in 2002 and he is as interesting and charming in person as he is provocative and enlightening on the page.

Since then, the combination of personal opinion, hard-won experience and bullet lists of tips and tactics has become a universal trope of a million blogs (mine included).

Enchantment: The Art of Changing Hearts, Minds, and Actions, Guy’s new book, uses this format and draws on Guy’s experience over 20 years in technology and VC to help you ‘win friends and influence people’, as Dale Carnegie put it.

Where Seth Godin’s books highlight opportunities, Enchantment tells you have to take advantage of them. It is full of tips (very useful) and stories (more useful when they come from Guy’s experience, less useful otherwise).

Because he’s a mensch (his highest praise, I think), he’s not encouraging you to manipulate people but put your best self forward and contribute to your own success and other people’s. As a Brit, I’m more backward in coming forward and some of his advice might be better tuned to Silicon Valley than the Thames Valley. But everything he says is worth your consideration and I recommend the book highly.

I like this diagram he has created. It’s useful in itself and it’s a good plug for the book. In fact, it’s a good example of what you might call the Kawasaki: do good to make good.

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